New class added – Nov 1 – cooking grass-fed & other pastured meats low & slow AND fast

Is there anything better than the aroma of a delicious meal after a long day at work? And how about the satisfaction of welcoming family and guests to a beautiful holiday meal – and not being frazzled about the preparation?

I’ve added another class to the schedule! November 1st will focus on two approaches you can use to prepare 100% grass-fed beef and other pastured meats. You can use either a low & slow cooking, or fast – with the help of a pressure cooker – to create great taste and healthful nutrition in your home kitchen. These are methods you can use after a busy day on the job or for weekend entertainment.

Don’t dry out or toughen that roast, steak or free-range chicken. Learn how you can adapt either low&slow or fast cooking to your schedule.

For more information and to register, click here.

To find out about all classes – including artisan bread baking – scheduled in Oct, Nov. and Dec., click here.
Hope to see you!


Frost on the pumpkin means baking and cooking classes at Bull Brook Keep

What better way to warm up your kitchen – and light up the faces of family and friends – than with the aromas and flavors of freshly baked artisan breads, and luscious grass-fed beef, lamb, pastured pork or pasture-raised chicken?!

Lovely crispy crust

Lovely crispy crust

Yes, you can bake hearth breads in your home oven and with your busy schedule. Get your hands in dough and learn how to use time, temperature and hydration (the amount of water in the dough) to bend the baking process to fit your schedule.
Each class is limited to 4-6 students. Beverages, samples and hearty lunch provided. Cost: $48.50/student (plus small credit card fee).

  • Classes based on poolish (a bubbly, batter-like yeast starter used to make focaccia, ciabatta and pizza), Oct. 29 or Dec. 10. For details.
  • Classes based on French Sourdough (a mild, versatile country bread), Nov. 19, or Dec. 17. For details.
  • Cooking Grass-fed Beef, and pastured Pork and Chicken
    Pastured meats tend to be lean, which is why it’s so important to cook them properly. You don’t want to dry out your roast, or toughen a steak. In our meat cooking class, we’ll look at two approaches for great taste, tenderness and high nutrition: low and slow, and fast using a pressure cooker to make delicious short ribs or beef stew, fall-apart chicken or bone broth, to name just a few dishes.

    5-7-hr flamed-brandy chuck roast

    5-7-hr flamed-brandy chuck roast

    Each class is limited to 4-6 students. Beverages, samples and a hearty, meaty lunch provided. Cost: $49.25/student (plus small credit card fee).

  • Cook delicious pastured meats fast & slow, Nov.1, 1-5PM, for details.
  • li>Cook delicious pastured meats fast & slow, Dec. 3, 11AM-3PM, for details.
  • How long has it been??? What’s happening on this city-girl’s farm.

    What happened?? Where did the summer go?
    Well, if your life’s anything like mine, your Monday-Friday went to work and family. And your weekends, if you planned well and were able to add a dash of good luck, were spent doing lots of chores. You know – the laundry, food shopping, buying school supplies, banking, and repairing this-and-that. Hopefully you took some time for coffee with friends, and maybe dinner out with your sweetie.

    A few 2016 calves

    A few 2016 calves

    The growing season started with the arrival of our spring calves. All our new little BueLingos were born out on our pastures and unassisted. This season also required that we up our game and manage our pastures for a slightly larger herd. This summer’s frequent rains helped keep the much-needed grass growing.
    We began harvesting in July, and will take our final two beeves to the custom USDA processor in a month or so. (Those two animals will go exclusively for ground beef and summer sausage.)
    Today, we get ready for an annual right-of-passage – tagging every calf, and castrating the bull calves. Once castrated, the male calves are called steers, and they’ll graze for two years to harvest age and condition. Until that time, all the cattle will enjoy the best of care: 365 days a year on grassy fields, sunshine and fresh air, a 100% grass diet, and the company and calm of their herd. It makes for contented, healthy cattle, and, ultimately, great-tasting and highly nutritious beef.
    And that’s the heart of it: health and happiness – for the the cows, the land, and for you and me.
    We all benefit from farming and living with a tiny carbon hoof print (TM)*, truly sustainable farming.
    Thank you for visiting the farm and sharing the story of your food journey. I really enjoyed making frequent deliveries in Amery, Polk and St. Croix counties, and the Minneapolis/St. Paul metro area.
    I look forward to meeting you. Please visit. And until then, enjoy the cooling fall weather.

    *tiny carbon hoofprint is a US registered trademark belonging to Bull Brook Keep.

    Our Variety Packages are SOLD OUT for 2016. Ground beef and Summer Sausage still available.

    Thanks to all our Bull Brook Keep customers for a great season. It was great to meet you on the farm or when making deliveries. The demand for our 100% grass-fed beef continues to grow, and we are now sold out of our variety packages for this year. However, we have ground beef and summer sausage available, and I recommend ordering sooner than later. Click here to order online. If you’re interested in 100% grass-fed beef for next year, please check back. You can find out about our variety packages by clicking here. We’ll reopen our web store in May … Continue reading

    Storm drops cow on farm? Feeling a bit at Oz.

    Squinting, I picked up my phone to check the time: 5:15AM. Why was I awake? Then I remembered last night’s storm: lightning, rolling thunder and walls of rain driven by high winds – gusts that tore tree branches ripped up my tomato plants. The little bull calf must have been frightened. He’d been left in the field after I moved the rest of the herd across the driveway and to a fresh paddock. Darn calf. It just wouldn’t stay by its moma. It kept running around me and double-backing to the old field. Crazy kid. 5:15AM. Sunday morning and the … Continue reading

    Chinese herbs, acupuncture, spinal manipulation for dogs, cats & livestock. Live, June 11, 9-9:30AM CT

    Jody_team_07What: Deep Roots Radio interview with Dr. Jody Bearman, lead in the all-woman, holistic practice called Anshen Veterinary Acupuncture, LLC., in Madison, Wisconsin.
    When: Saturday, June 11, 2016, 9:00-9:30 AM Central Time
    Where: Broadcast and streamed live from the studios of WPCA Radio 93.1FM and on the Internet.
    Why: Dr. Jody, and her associates, use Chinese herbal medicine, acupuncture, spinal manipulations and other approaches to address illness and disease and to promote wellness in dogs, cats, goats, horses and other livestock. Why? How effective are they?

    That’s what we’ll talk about on the show tomorrow morning. I hope you’ll tune in.


    Extra! Extra! Get your free Deep Roots Radio podcast here!

    Miss an episode of Deep Roots Radio? Here’s a bunch of them – conversations with some of the most interesting farmers, ranchers, reporters, writers, cooks, scientists, policymakers and thought leaders. Download and listen whenever you like, or click and listen online.

    Saturdays, 9:00-9:30AM CT on

    Saturdays, 9:00-9:30AM CT on

    Hay River – America’s first certified organic pumpkin seed oil.

    Jay Gilbertson and Ken Sequine describe their certified organic pumpkin seed oil farm and business – America’s first – at Hay River farm, Wisconsin.

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    Around the Farm Table’s Inga Witsher

    Television hostess, Inga Witsher describes why she visits and films Wisconsin small family farms.

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    Chefs for sustainable food – James Beard Foundation VP Kris Moon on the new Impact Programs

    We all know that chefs can cook, some of them extraordinarily. And we know that what they cook can reflect and flavor local culture. But did you know our chefs can – and increasingly do – play a role in redesigning a more sustainable, healthful food system in America? I really enjoyed this conversation with Kris Moon, Vice President of the James Beard Foundation because the foundation’s Impact Programs spotlight and promote chef-led efforts to rebuild a more nutritious and regionally-sourced food system in our country. Experienced and trained in restaurant management, nutrition and major networking events, Moon is leading … Continue reading