Sizzling burgers, juicy steaks, luscious roasts – time to order 100% grass-fed beef

It’s that time again – harvest at Bull Brook Keep, home of 100% grass-fed beef. What does it mean? Great taste, high nutrition, and eating with a tiny carbon hoofprint(c) because our happy cattle enjoy fresh pasture grasses all summer and high-quality hay in the winter. They get a natural … Continue reading

Hungry Turtle Institute Exec Dir Kristen Lee-Charlson – rebuilding local food culture

Consumer demand for local, sustainably-produced food continues to climb. Food lovers are also searching for information about the farms, nutrition, taste and preparation of the delicious and nutrient-packed veggies, fruits, and pastured meats. And that’s where the Hungry Turtle Institute (HTI) comes in.11412084_726649344147183_462181339695038848_o
In its second year, HTI is a nonprofit dedicated to connecting food lovers and food growers to practical info and experiences, lively discussions, and other useful and fun resources. An example is the Hungry Turtle Weekend

July 18, 2015 Hungry Turtle Weekend

July 18, 2015 Hungry Turtle Weekend

July 17-18, 2015 in Amery, WI.
Kristen Lee-Charlson is HTI’s first full-time executive director. She comes to the Institute with a deep background in whole-foods preparation as a chef and caterer. A consultant to chefs with regard to local food sourcing, she also was instigator and editor of Edible Missoula.
I hope you enjoy this Deep Roots Radio conversation with Kristen and think to participate in this and future Hungry Turtle Weekends.

Sylvia

July 18 – Eat Local Farm Tour and Hungry Turtle Weekend – Amery, WI – Here’s the skinny

Mark your calendar. Set your iPhone (or Android). Gas up the car, or oil the bike chains. Car-pool with friends. Create a MeetUp.
Whatever you do, get ready to make tracks to this weekend’s Eat Local Farm Tour and Hungry Turtle Weekend in Amery, Wisconsin. Here’s what’s happening July 18:

Eat Local Farm Tour
What: This is the annual Eat Local Farm Tour organized by the Twin Cities’ metro area natural food coops. A great brochure EatLocalFarmTour_2015_Guide-Map-WEB has a map and descriptions of sustainable farms within an 80-mile radius of Minneapolis and St. Paul. Yup, we’re just a lovely scenic drive from where you live.
Bull Brook Keep is one of several farms northeast of the Twin Cities, and we’re part of the Hungry Turtle Farmers Cooperative. Steady Hand Farm and Fresh Pastures Farm are just a stone’s throw away.
When: July 18, 2015, 9:30AM – 4:00 PM

At Bull Brook KeepSummerIcon
– We’ll demonstrate rotational grazing at 10:00AM, 1:00PM and 3:00
– You’ll have a chance to see how many plants you can identify within a square yard
– Sample our summer sausage (nitrate- and nitrite-free) and ground beef
– Guided pasture walk
Map and directions

Hungry Turtle Weekend – July 18
Hungry Turtle Weekend activities are held at the Amery Food Hub (comprised of the Farm Table restaurant, the Hungry Turtle Farmers Cooperative and the Hungry Turtle Institute (educational nonprofit)). The Hub is housed within totally renovated historic buildings in downtown Amery, just 10 minutes from my farm. The address is 110 Keller Avenue, Amery, Wi.
– 9:00-9:30AM – A quick walk across the street to the Saturday morning Farmers Market to pick up ingredients for the food cooking demo back at the Food Hub
– 10:00 – Tour of the Amery Food Hub (restaurant, commercial kitchen/teaching kitchen, and art gallery)
– 11:00 – Play with Your Food – activities for children
– 2:00PM – Tour of the Amery Food Hub
– 2:30PM – Book signing and talk with Beth Dooley, food journalist and cook-book author
– 3:00PM – Demo by Farm Table Executive Chef Jesse Spitzack
– 5:30PM – Meet & Greet with local sustainable farmers, and entertainment by the Danger Rangers

I hope to see you Saturday!
Sylvia

July 11, 9-9:30AM CT. The power of the Hungry Turtle (Institute) to re-invigorate local food culture.

What: Deep Roots Radio interview with Kristen Lee-Charlson, new Executive Director of Hungry Turtle Institute in Amery, Wisconsin.
When: Saturday, July 11, 2015, 9:00-9:30AM Central Time
Where: Broadcast and streamed live from the studios of WPCA Radio, 93.1FM and worldwide at www.wpcaradio.org.
Why: Consumer demand for local, sustainably-produced food continues to climb. Food lovers are also searching for information about the farms, nutrition, taste and preparation of the delicious and nutrient-packed veggies, fruits, and pastured meats. Ah, that’s were the Hungry Turtle Institute (HTI) comes in.
In its second year, HTI is a nonprofit dedicated to connecting food lovers and food growers to practical info and experiences, lively discussions, and other useful and fun resources. An example is the Hungry Turtle Weekend coming up July 18th.

Deep Roots Radio, 91.3FM and www.wpcaradio.org

Deep Roots Radio, 91.3FM and www.wpcaradio.org

How to find your local farmer – July 4, 9-9:30AM CT, Deep Roots Radio

What: Deep Roots Radio interview with Julien Roberge, co-founder of Agrilliance, a website that quickly helps consumers find their local, sustainable farmers. When: Saturday, July 4th, 9:00-9:30AM Central Time Where: WPCA Radio, 93.1FM and streamed live at www.wpcaradio.org Why: The demand for high-quality, sustainably-grown foods continues to grow in the … Continue reading

June 27, 9-9:30AM CT, live w Wedge & Wheel cheese shop. Why a public radio guy now promotes local, artisan, farmstead cheese.

What: Deep Roots Radio interview with Chris Cahtz, owner/proprietor of Stillwater, Minnesota’s Wedge & Wheel cheese shop and bistro. Nineteen months into this venture, the assortment and menu is growing with demand.
When: Saturday, June 27, 2015, 9:00-9:30AM Central Time
Where: Broadcast and streamed live from the studios of WPCA Radio, 93.1FM, and www.wpcaradio.org
Why: Why would a public radio exec move from broadcast to cheese mongering? And why in Stillwater, Minnesota? Tune in and meet Chris Cahtz: hear his story and why he’s fostering the growth of local, farmstead cheeses. I think you’ll discover that it makes all the sense in the world to make tracks for the Wedge & Wheel.
I hope you’ll tune in.
Sylvia

Connecting the dots between what we eat and how it's grown

Connecting the dots between what we eat and how it’s grown

Cody Holmes – growing from grass-fed ranch to regional food hub.

Cody Holmes began beef ranching conventionally – with all the hormones, additives and labor demanded by the conventional system. Once he’d decided he’d had enough, he adopted and adapted his operation into one of the model multi-species grazing farms in the USA.
Author of “Ranching Full Time on Three Hours a Day,” Cody and his wife and partner Dawnnell and their daughter Taylor, operate Real Farm Foods on their 1,100-acre farm, Rockin H Ranch, in Norwood, Missouri (east of Springfield). But they are not standing pat in their business. Cody is extending his enterprise to include many other farms and farmers in a regional food hub providing grass-fed meats, vegetables, eggs and dairy, and a growing variety of value-added products.
In this Deep Roots Radio interview, Cody describes the vision and challenges of developing a local food hub to meet his area’s growing demand for delicious, high-quality, clean, and healthful foods. Enjoy.
Sylvia

Connecting the dots between what we eat and how it's grown

Connecting the dots between what we eat and how it’s grown

Audio

Investing slow $$$ to build a better food system, faster. Chat with Renewing the Countryside’s Brett Olson.

One way to move America’s food system to great taste, high nutrition, environmental stewardship, humane animal welfare, and fair wages is through thoughtful investment – slow money. What is slow money? How does it work and what does it mean to you and me? How can you and I make a difference? Find out in this Deep Roots Radio interview with Brett Olson, co-founder and creative director of Renewing the Countryside. Minnesota’s first Slow Monday event is June 17, 2015, 5:00-8:00PM at Como Park, St. Paul, Minn. For information on this event, click here.

The real dirt on soil-Why it matters to human/earth health. Live w A&L Great Lakes Lab soil guru

BueLingo beef cattle graze

Our beef cattle graze all growing season

I did some weeding in the herb garden while the morning was still cool. It had rained yesterday, so the soil was loose and earthworms were everywhere. I shook all kinds of bugs from the weeds’ roots. For the 300th time, I wondered why weeds grow so aggressively while basil takes forever to sprout.
After half an hour, I got up off my knees and stretched my back. As I brushed my jeans, I saw that my nails were – once again – packed with dirt. I bent down and grabbed a handful of garden soil. It was rich, black and crumbly. It smelled clean and warm and, well, earthy.
Dave and I work hard to keep our soil alive with earthworms, insects, bacteria and fungi. Why? Because it makes a huge difference to the nutrition in the grass our cows eat and to the vegetables we grow in the garden. How does it make a difference? Ahh, that’s the topic for tomorrow’s Deep Roots Radio show!
What: Deep Roots Radio live with Jamie Bultemeier, agronomist and certified crop advisor with A&L Great Lakes Laboratories, Inc., Fort Wayne, IN
When: June 13, 2015, 9:00-9:30 AM Central Time
Where: Broadcast and streamed live from the studios of WPCA Radio, 93.1FM (in and around Amery, WI), and worldwide on the web at wpcaradio.org
I hope you’ll join us.
Sylvia Burgos Toftness
Deep Roots Radio, 91.3FM and www.wpcaradio.org

Deep Roots Radio, 91.3FM and www.wpcaradio.org