Field walk. Meet the moos! Taste great beef. Saturday, July 15, 10AM-4PM @ Bull Brook Keep

How much grass can a cow eat in a day? How fast does a calf run? Do you know how grazing improves the land? What top nutrients are in grass-fed beef?

You can find out this Saturday at the Eat Local Co-op Farm Tour! And Bull Brook Keep is one of the 27 rural and urban farms welcoming visitors to our farms that day.

What you’ll see and do:
– Move the herd at 10AM, 1:00PM and 3:00PM
– Gather wildflowers during a field walk
– Hear how 100% grass diet benefits pastures, cows and people
– See how our BueLingo cattle thrive without grain, hormones or subclinical antibiotics
– Taste some really delicious beef


We’ve got lots of parking, and there’ll be a porta-potty for your convenience. We are an easy, and very scenic, drive (here’s the map) from the Twin Cities and any point in Polk or St. Croix counties.

So grab your sunglasses, cap and sun-screen and come on out. We’d love to learn about your food journey.

Sylvia & Dave

Just what is a CSA farm? Is there one near you?

from CSA

CSAs, like farmers markets, have been increasing in number dramatically in the last 10 years. Here’s some basic information about CSAs and why they’re a good source of fresh, local produce.
CSA stands for Community Supported Agriculture. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, each CSA consists of a community of individuals who pledge support to a farm operation so that the farmland becomes, either legally or spiritually, the community’s farm, with the growers and consumers providing mutual support and sharing the risks and benefits of food production. Typically, members or “share-holders” of the farm or garden pledge in advance to cover the anticipated costs of the farm operation and farmer’s salary. In return, they receive shares in the farm’s bounty throughout the growing season, as well as satisfaction gained from reconnecting to the land and participating directly in food production. Members also share in the risks of farming, including poor harvests due to unfavorable weather or pests.
By direct sales to community members, who have provided the farmer with working capital in advance, growers receive better prices for their crops, gain some financial security, and are relieved of much of the burden of marketing.

Find a CSA Farm Near You Search National farm databases by city, state, or zipcode

Local Harvest – http://www.localharvest.org/csa/
AgMap – http://agmap.psu.edu/
Search the Business category for the term Community Supported Agriculture or use the Advanced Search to find a local CSA.
Wilson College, Robyn Van En Center, CSA Farm Database – http://www2.wilson.edu/CsaSearch/
The Eat Well Guide – http://www.eatwellguide.org/

Local Food Directories. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Marketing Service. Includes directories of farmers markets, on-farm markets, CSAs, and food hubs.
https://www.ams.usda.gov/services/local-regional/food-directories
Local Food Directories. ATTRA – The National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service – http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/local_food/search.php